Creative Photography: 10 Things A Successful Photographer Will Never Do To Stay Creative

Introduction

Creative photography is a special type of photography that strives to discover new patterns, color, adventure and beauty among many other things. This makes creative photography very exciting. It awakens all the senses of a photographer adding a very artistic touch to their final work. Many amateur photographers dream of becoming creative photography pros. There are however very few who actually master it although creativity is an inborn aspect of life in everyone.

Successful photographers have already learned to keep their creative juices flowing which is why they enjoy tremendous success in their trade. They also know much more on every aspect of photography. Most importantly, they know what they shouldn’t do as professional photographers. If you are interested in knowing what you shouldn’t do as a professional photographer in order to stay creative, you are in the right place. Below are 10 things a successful photographer will never do to stay creative.

1. Waste time thinking about gear

This is one of the most important things a successful photographer will avoid at all costs. Photography gear may be important for enhancing shots however it’s not as important as core photography when taking creative photos. Successful photographers know this especially in regards to creative photography which is why they don’t waste too much time thinking about gear. In fact, most creative shots come out better when they are taken naturally without gear.

2. Leave the camera at home

Creative photography is all about capturing unrehearsed moments anywhere anytime. Successful photographers know the pain of missing great opportunities because of simple mistakes like leaving the camera at home. They therefore make a point of having a camera anywhere they go. This enables them to capture interesting moments regular photographers miss. This is part of what makes them stand out.

3. Use the same technique over and over again

There is nothing creative about using the same photography technique all the time. Successful photographers stay away from stagnant photography techniques which hinder them from growing their skill and experimenting. The best photographers offer variety which can only be offered by using many techniques and being open to new ideas. Successful photographers avoid monotony at all costs.

4. Ignore the importance of copyrighting work

Copyrighting original work is advisable for obvious reasons i.e. you get recognition among other benefits i.e. money from people interested in using your work. Any experienced photographer know the importance of protecting their valuable work especially if it falls under the creative photography docket. Photographers become successful by receiving recognition and financial returns from their work. Copyrighting safeguards a photographers future earnings on past work and also keeps a record of their creative efforts avoiding duplication. This is precisely why successful photographers don’t ignore the importance of copyrighting.

5. Share technical problems with clients

This is another thing successful photographers will never do to stay focused, creative and maintain their reputation. Although it is important to be honest with your clients at all times, successful photographers know the dangers of sharing technical problems with their clients. Being honest when faced with technical problems does more harm than good from a professional photographer’s point of view. For instance, clients can start viewing you as unprofessional which can hurt your reputation denying you referral business. Successful photographers have learned to stay mute about technical problems when dealing with clients. They go as far as planning ahead to avoid occurrences where they will be forced to share technical problems. Dealing with technical problems internally also helps to maintain focus which is important to stay creative.

6. Take each and every assignment they get

You can’t jump at each and every photography opportunity and expect to be remain creative. Creative photography is about inspiration. Successful creative photographers know inspiration is hard to come by which is why they choose their assignments carefully. For instance, they never take assignments just to make money. This is because they understand the importance of being in the right mind frame when working. This explains why they successful photographers don’t take assignments just to please clients. They have to feel inspired which doesn’t happen all the time.

7. Create friction with event planners

Successful photographers also avoid creating friction with event planners at all cost. This has something to do with staying focused and being able to explore. Successful photographers understand the important role event planners play in their success. They provide photographers with the necessary support they need to do a great job. For instance, event planners obviously have a lot of influence in things like venue setup which can affect the final outcome of creative photography. In order to increase the chances of doing a perfect job, successful photographers will do everything they can to maintain good rapport with event planners.

8. Try to be the life of an event

This is another mistake successful photographers never make. Successful photographers understand exactly what their job is in any event. They know their work is simply capturing memorable times. This explains why they never go overboard trying to interact too much with guests. Amateur photographers always make this mistake which shifts their concentration affecting their creativity. Events are not held for photographers. You shouldn’t therefore try to network, entertain guests or do anything outside your job description because you will end up losing focus and affecting your creativity.

9. Doing everything themselves

Successful photographers have also learned to concentrate on their core work which explains why they don’t do everything themselves. As mentioned above, creative photography is all about concentration and focus. When these two ingredients are missing, it is very hard for a photographer to remain creative. Doing too much at once definitely shifts focus and concentration.

10. Ignore the internet

Finally, successful photographers never underestimate the power of the internet. Part of the reason successful photographers become so successful is recognizing what works and what doesn’t. The internet can be very great source of inspiration for photographers looking for new creative ideas. Although creative photography is more about originality, successful photographers know how important the internet is in offering creative ideas which is why they never ignore it.

Conclusion

In summary, the above information should help aspiring photographers avoid common pitfalls that can easily stall their creative photography careers. Although there may be many other professional photography taboos, the above information is adequate enough to guide amateur photographer in the right direction.

5 Tips to Improve Your Photography

The following 5 tips represent the top 5 things that have helped me the most to develop as a photographer and I continually refer to these to further my development. I hope they too can help you along your own journey.

1. It sounds simple but it’s true; looking at good photographs will make you a better photographer. Study images captured by the best photographers in your field.

Personally I’ve found continually looking at other photographers’ work and studying what it is that appeals to me in images that I like to have led to the most improvement in my photography. I really recommend you to be stern in which images you study – don’t study good photographs but rather only study ‘great’ photographs. A great photograph will make you stop and take notice and capture your interest. When looking at such images ask yourself the following questions:

a) What elements immediately appeal to you in the image? Is it the light? The subject? The composition? Perhaps it was the low angle viewpoint? Understand what it is that you like so much from the image and then set out to include these elements in your own work. The more images you study the more apparent trends in what you like so much become.

b) Observe the time of day that the image was captured? Was it at pre-dawn or after sunrise? Try and establish a trend and then set-out to shoot during the same times of the day

c) Observe the direction of lighting; is the light hitting the subject from the back, front or is the subject side lit?

d) What subject continually makes for a strong image?

There are numerous online sources where you can seek out great photographs but none better in my opinion than 500px. Simply visit the ‘Popular’ and ‘Editors Choice’ sections and choose your respective genre (i.e. Landscapes). There is even an iPhone App that you can download so that you can be inspired whilst you’re on the go.

2. Only show your very best images – not just images you’re reasonably happy with but images you feel proud to show. There was once a question asked in a presentation by a successful photographer and they were asked a simple question from one of the audience members. The question was how to do you become a great photographer? The successful photographer’s answer was then just as equally simple; “never show anyone your bad photos”. I think this is very true and just very recently is something that I’ve began to do better after a recent moment when I realised that I was sharing images on social media outlets because I felt the need to keep producing images regularly and by doing so compromising on quality and ultimately compromising my reputation along the way… Don’t make the same mistake that I made and only show your very best images. If you’re in two minds or not sure about an image then such an image is just not good enough! Only show images that you’re absolutely convinced that they are a hero shot. Showing only 5 very strong images is much better than showing 8 very strong coupled with two weak images; those two weak images will greatly weaken the impact of the other eight and cause the viewer to change their perception about the quality of you as a photographer. The old golden rule still remains; quality is better than quantity.

3. This third rule is more applicable to Landscape Photography. In order to improve as a Landscape Photographer you need to be incredibly persistent! If you visit a scene and you’ve captured an image that you’re not quite happy with because the lighting conditions may have not been the best, then don’t settle; return to the same location until you capture an image of the same scene in amazing light. If you speak to any seasoned Landscape Photographer they will tell you that most of their trips and those painful early pre-dawn starts prove fruitless… Accept that you are not always going to come back with images to share and if you’re finding that you’re capturing a worthwhile image on each of your shoots then it’s not because you’re lucky but rather your quality expectations are not high enough! It takes years to build a collection of images that you can feel proud of and I have the upmost respect for successful landscape photographers for this very reason as I have a somewhat understanding of just how much effort has gone into producing their collection of images.

4. Learn as much as you can about your favoured genre of photography. It’s very true; you never stop learning and I like to think that I’m only just learning the basics in a lifelong quest to feel fulfilled. I never stop trying to learn and I quite regularly seek tuition and workshops from photographers who I deem to be among the best in Landscape Photography in my area. I love to learn more and fuel my desires to learn as much as I can about the craft of photography. I’ve met some great people along my short journey so far and I’ve found that the community of Australian Landscape Photographers to be a friendly one where we try to share knowledge to benefit one another. Identify your favourite photographers in your area and don’t be afraid to contact them about receiving some paid for knowledge sharing. Don’t expect that these photographers will just tell you everything that they know for free and instead respect that these photographers need to make a living from what they do.

5. Finally my last tip is to just simply get out there and shoot! Learn by doing! Stop talking about it and just do it! Achieve better results through committed action. There will be many frustrations and mistakes along the way but mistakes are another word for experience. For each failed shoot a lesson will be learnt and this is what will greatly help you become a better photographer. I’ve made my share of mistakes and I’m quite sure I’ll continue to make a few more as I get more experienced but I can tell you that I am much better for each mistake that I’ve made. For example I once left behind an L bracket that holds the camera on my tripod head in the car where I was off bound for a pre-dawn waterfall shoot. Only once I had arrived after completing the hour long trek in the dark did I realise that I forgot the L Bracket… Year’s on and I’ve never forgotten that same L bracket ever again…

I hope you got something out of these tips and if so I would greatly appreciate you letting me know. I would love to hear your comments.

Common Photo Mistakes – How to Avoid Them

Let’s face it, everybody makes mistakes. That’s what being human is all about. That includes making common photo mistakes as well. This article will give you the 5 most common and how to eliminate them most of the time and as a result improve your photography dramatically. Here they are:

1. Bad background. It is easy to get distracted by the subject you are focusing your attention on. If you remember to just check the background behind your subject, you will see a big improvement in your pictures. Just paying attention to it will cause you to notice when there is something distracting going on behind your subject. You can then move your subject or move yourself to a better angle to get a better background.

2. Bad composition. Many photographers are guilty of what I call “The bullseye syndrome.” That is placing your subject or center of interest in the exact center of your photograph. Learn just a few simple composition rules like the rule of thirds, use of leading lines, and balance and your photography will be much better.

3. Using the wrong camera setting. I know it’s not fun, but if you read your camera manual before you set out on your photography session, it will be a big help. Reading about when you should use a certain camera setting will help you avoid many common mistakes.

4. Taking Blurry Photos. Blur is caused by either poor focusing technique or motion blur. Sometimes it is helpful to first aim you camera exactly at what’s most important to be in focus, press your shutter button half way, and then re-compose your picture before you squeeze your shutter the rest of the way.

Motion blur is caused by camera movement or the movement of your subject. Learn what effects shutter speed and how you can use camera settings to control it. Using faster shutter speeds will stop both kinds of motion blur. Using a tripod or your camera’s flash will prevent blur caused by camera movement.

5. Not having enough memory or battery power. This is the worst cardinal sin of all. Always have enough memory and spare batteries with you. If you run out of camera memory or your batteries go dead, you’re completely out of luck. Is there anything else more frustrating then going to take a picture and not being able to.

Digital camera technology has advance so much, there is no excuse to not get great photographs. The internet is a great source for you to get additional photography tips and techniques. But of course, the best advice I can give you is to have fun. It’s an exciting time to be interested in photography. Develop a childlike curiosity and explore your world with your camera.